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Generation Success striving to help break the jobless cycle for young job seekers

  • Apr 6, 2014
Amber-Lee Smith, 16, has been looking for retail/admin work since leaving school 16 months ago.

FOR young job seekers, looking for work is a job in itself.

There’s preparing and updating resumes, filing applications, online and in person, as well as striving to broadening their skill base to make them more attractive to the widest possible variety of employers.

After leaving school last year Blacktown teenager Amber-Lee Smith, 16, is the type of young person the Generation Successforum is hoping to create better opportunities for.

Some of Australia’s leading companies, including Leighton, NAB, Commonwealth Bank, Toll, Spotless and Telstra, will join Generation Success leaders Woolworths and News Corp, publisher of The Sunday Telegraph, when they meet Prime Minister Tony Abbott to come up with real-world solutions to the youth unemployment issue at the forum later this month.

Figures show job vacancies increased slightly to 140,800 nationally but employment participation statistics show 320,000 young people have left the workforce and are not seeking employment in NSW, an increase of 19,000 from a year ago.

Surveys by Mission Australia Youth Society, which found one in four people aged 15-19 fear the jobs and training will not be there when they finish school, and only half think it will be possible to pursue their chosen career in the area they live, is what has prompted the corporate heavy-hitters to join forces.

With youth unemployment double the national ­average at more than 12 per cent, the odds aren’t in 16-year-old Amber-Lee’s favour as she spends most of her week ­looking for jobs in retail and ­administration, but she does not do it alone. She is a client of Job Prospects at Blacktown, a government-funded organisation that helps those having difficulty finding and keeping work, mostly young people and those with disabilities.

Figures out this week show job vacancies increased slightly to 140,800 nationally but employment statistics show 320,000 young people have left the workforce and are not seeking employment in NSW, an increase of 19,000 from a year ago. Half of this increase was in Blacktown.

 

Source:  The Sunday Telegraph, Sunday 6 April 2014, Ben McClellan

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